Italy’s Cable Car Tragedy

Cable-Car Map at Stresa on Lake Maggiore

The terrible accident yesterday in Italy sent me to my photographs of the time I spent there just over two years ago. The Italian lakes are beautiful at any time but my week there was exceptional, especially in the town of Stresa with its access to so many other towns along the lakes and to so many lovely walks in the mountains and hills around.

One of the Hiking Trails

The Cable car ride to Mottorone above Stresa was one such and I wanted to put just a few pictures up to show why people go up there in summer. Winter, of course, can be for skiing, but summer is for walking among the trees and looking at the amazing views down to the lakes.

Summit

I had often though of returning to do that trip again but when an accident like this happens, one’s faith in machinery takes a bit of a knock!

19 thoughts on “Italy’s Cable Car Tragedy”

  1. Our time in Stresa was minimal so I never got to take this ride, but I have friends who did. It’s shocking when something like this happens, and does, as you say, shake your faith, scarring the memories.

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    1. Yes, I’m not sure if I’ll trust another one – maybe in Switzerland because I have great faith in the Swiss to maintain things although I know they had a tragedy not so long ago as well. But we’re here now so mustn’t dwell on it. Isn’t it funny, when I think of Stresa my first thought is of the town plaza and the ice-cream parlour there!

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  2. We shall have to await the outcome of the investigation and see what was the cause. Italy can be a bit slapdash with safety (I don’t know about cable-cars and funiculars though) but not as bad as China which has had 3 nasty bridge collapses in the past few weeks.

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  3. That was such a dreadful accident. Although I’ve not been to Stresa, I love mountains and always want to go up a cable car or chair lift to see the views! I’ve often had that slight feeling of ‘hope the cables are strong enough’ as I’ve floated over the mountain side, but I’ve never really thought they might not be – until now. I don’t think it will put me off however, as this is such a rare accident and I imagine safety checks will be even more rigorous after this, for a while at least.

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    1. I think it will put me off cable-cars for a bit – and funiculars – but it won’t put me off travel. Unfortunately, there are so many lovely places in that area that are only accessible by cable-car – even in Como – that I hope the Italian Government put in a series of check-ups to convince the public that all is safe again.

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    1. We kept meeting Dolimitans (is that the word?) who would insist they were Austrian, not Italian, and one restaurant we ate in had photographs of Bismark and other Generals all over the place

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  4. As this news unfolded yesterday, accompanied by the outrage over the Ryanair flight incident, we looked at each other during each article…. “there but for the grace of God”….and all that. Hard to imagine the horror for those people as the cable car broke away.

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    1. For a few moments I thought “I shall never, ever go up a funicular or take a cable-car ride again” but then I remembered how quick we are to forge these things so no doubt you’ll find me again flying high over the hills!

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  5. Yes it was a horrible accident, gave me the shivers. In my mountaineering and ice climbing days I used these cable cars and lifts extensively, especially across the French Alps but also a little in Italy and Austria. Sometimes it felt more scary than the climbing. Same thing in the Himalayas getting around in Twin Otter aeroplanes, exhilarating but very scary too.
    And….. I’m beginning to dislike WordPress, it’s not the writing and posting, it’s unfollowing people unknowingly, not being allied to comment despite being signed in. Nuts 😤

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