My Tale from the Vienna Woods

Tales from the Vienna Woods by Johann Srauss was playing in the background as I worked and my thoughts drifted to the trip I’d had a few years ago through that lovely green space outside Vienna, designated a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO.  The Woods are not as portrayed in the two films I’ve seen: rather … Continue reading My Tale from the Vienna Woods

Sculpture Saturday

And now, for something completely different (thank you Monty Python).  (this was still in my Drafts folder so I'm re-posting it as I'm unsure what is happening. Another mix-up with Blocks?) Les Braves by Anilore Banonon on Omaha Beach, Normandy Commissioned by the French government on the 60th Anniversary of WWll and erected in 2004 … Continue reading Sculpture Saturday

ARRAS: Wellington Quarry

A visit to The Wellington Quarry, which is in the middle of the old city of Arras, reveals a little-known story of World War I and is a good place in which to try and understand the horrors of World War I.

Saint-Symphorien Cemetery World War 1

I read in the news that Theresa May, Prime Minister of Great Britain, is to travel to France to lay a wreath on the graves of two young British soldiers who were killed during World War 1.  One of them was the first man to die in that 'war to end all wars' and the … Continue reading Saint-Symphorien Cemetery World War 1

A Walk on the Ramparts of Ypres

I didn’t imagine it would be so difficult to write about my walk on the Ypres Salient in Belgium, as I followed the course of the World War l battle of 1917 but it’s impossible to write about the horrors of the 3rd Battle of Ypres (also known as Passchendaele) without including great chunks of … Continue reading A Walk on the Ramparts of Ypres

Journey’s End at Ypres – In Remembrance

I thought my first post after my trip to Belgium last week would be about my walks around the battlefields of Ypres, but my mind is so full of the experience of seeing R.C. Sherriff’s play Journey’s End, performed in an Ammunition Dump in that Belgium city, that I want to talk about that instead. … Continue reading Journey’s End at Ypres – In Remembrance

A CRETAN VILLAGE WITH 2 MUSEUMS

Crete is the largest island in Greece, a place of dramatic mountain ranges and gorges dotted with ancient ruins and architecture from the medieval period onwards.  Known as the cradle of civilisation and the birthplace of Zeus, the island provides the backdrop for many of the Greek myths and legends we are familiar with. Throughout … Continue reading A CRETAN VILLAGE WITH 2 MUSEUMS

HIROSHIMA – August 1945 and TODAY

It was Sunday,August 6, 1945, and a hot midsummer sun shone from the blue sky over Hiroshima, Japan. It had been a night of constant alerts with sirens warning of planes overhead but in the morning the all-clear sounded. The streets were full of people, workers returning from night shifts, day workers on their way to take their place, military workers, factory watchmen, women shopping, secondary school children making fire breaks, all, we can suppose, weary after a sleepless night.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Time

  This is the AFTER photograph.  I wasn't there to take the BEFORE shot, but most of us will have seen the terrible pictures of the 1944 D-Day Landings in Normandy, France, even seen the film The Longest Day, in which the graphic images of the horrors of that day and the terrible happenings on the … Continue reading Weekly Photo Challenge: Time

Bayeux: D-Day Landings in Normandy

Bayeux is the only town in Normandy to be left completely undamaged after World War II and had the great good fortune to be quickly liberated by the Allies after the D-Day landings. For a brief period it was the capital of Free France after General De Gaulle arrived hot on the heels of the Allied forces in 1944 and set up his government in the town.