Six Word Saturday

Linked to https://travelwithintent.com/2020/11/21/beauties-once-soaring-fir-tree-

Not Yet Christmas, Here Comes Spring.

This wasn’t here yesterday. Seen from my balcony this morning my neighbour’s tree has burst into blossom. Maybe not ‘burst’ but showing the flag anyway.

Silent Wednesday 11/11/2020

Lest we Forget – Yarn Bombing, Sandown, Isle of Wight

Sculpture Saturday – Cardiff

IN MEMORY OF THE MERCHANT SEAFARERS FROM THE PORTS OF BARRY PENARTH CARDIFF WHO DIED IN TIMES OF WAR

Challenge hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

This striking Merchant Seaman’s Memorial in Cardiff Bay is in the form of a sleeping face fused with a ship’s hull. This was made by riveting plates of metal together, a traditional technique used in early iron and steel ship building. The sculptor Brian Fell, whose own father had been a merchant seaman, was commissioned to create the work in 1994 by Cardiff Bay Arts Trust, Cardiff Bay Development Corporation, Merchant Navy Memorial Committee and Cardiff County Council and it sits in Tiger Bay, Cardiff.

The ports of South Wales played a vital role in supplying coal from Welsh mines to fuel the world’s ships, especially warships and the allies were dependent on merchant vessels to transport troops, food, ammunition, raw materials and equipment. Shipping lanes ran around Pembrokeshire and around the island of Anglesey to get to and from the port of Liverpool and to access the Atlantic; within these lanes German U-boats targeted ships, sinking them with torpedoes and sea mines.

Over 150 vessels were sunk off the coast of Wales during the first World War alone.

Challenge hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

Sculpture Saturday: Budapest

Challenge hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

Heroes’ Square, Budapest

Designed in 1896 to mark the 1000th Anniversary of the Magyar conquest of the Carpathian Basin, Heroes’ Square (a name given to it in 1932) was designed in 1896 for the celebration of the Millennium of Hungary. The 36-m high column, topped by the Archangel Gabriel holding the Hungarian crown and cross, dominates the square. Around the base of the column are sculptures of Magyar chieftains from the 9th century mounted on horses. The colonnades that run behind the column hold 14 statues of earlier rulers and statesmen from King Stephen to Lajos Kossuth.

Base of Millennium Column in Heroes’ Square, Budapest
Magyar Chiefs at base of Millennium column, Budapest

Sculpture Saturday: Vietnam

An odd one this. We came across this still-being-worked-on monument to the Vietnam War in Hanoi back in 2008. I haven’t been back since so I presume it’s now finished. I was intrigued to discover that the men working on it were not sculptors but stone-masons who were working to a plan drawn up by a ‘government artist’.

One of the workers spoke reasonable English and told me that their parents had all been involved in the ‘American War’ as they called it. They were very keen on education and one of them in particular examined the book I was carrying very thoroughly. I forget now what it was but I gave it to him and he shook my hand so much in gratitude I though it would dislodge from its socket. I still wonder at their lack of bitterness.

One Word Sunday – SKYLINE

Linked to Debbie’s One Word Sunday here

A Misty Day by Chicago’s River
Chicago: Skyline emerges from the mist, viewed from Sears Tower

One Word Sunday – Arches

Posted in connection with Debbie’s One Word Sunday – Arches

Arches are hard to avoid anywhere with ancient Roman or Greek architecture but I managed to find a ‘natural’ arch to supplement the two historic ones from Sicily/

Cave of the Nymphaen at Syracuse, Sicily
Arch in the rocks off the coast of Lipari, Aeolian Islands
Greek Theatre, Taormina, Sicily

If I had to choose a favourite it would be the Greek Theatre one, through which one can see a snow-covered Etna during the winter or on a still, calm, day, perhaps smoke erupting from the still-active volcano, at all times a perfect background to the play being enacted.

Posted in connection with Debbie’s One Word Sunday – Arches

Weekly Photo Challenge – SMILE

 

f18620156
Laughing Camel at Petra

The camel was probably laughing at the tourists who were trying to bribe the owners of the few horses that were there to help those who couldn’t walk through the old city in the heat.  I won’t disclose the nationality of those who had disembarked from a cruise ship and thought to buy their way on to a horse, but they all seemed overweight to me.  Surprisingly, in this poor country, the horse owners insisted on first come firsdt served.  Or could there have been someone overlooking overlooking the situation, who wasn’t obvious to us?

Another reminder from that trip.  One in our group asked the guide if he could stop the sellers of jewellery from pestering us. He just quietly said., “No, Madam.  Your buying a small trinket from him could mean the difference between his children eating tonight or not”.  Something I’ve never forgotten when I’m feeling under pressure from itinerant sellers.

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Rise/Set

Sunrise in Thailand, as it came up over the Gulf.  Taken from the balcony of my favourite hotel, the Dusit Thani Hua Hin.

sunset from room
Sun just above the horizon

Sunrise over Gulf of Siam
Almost fully risen illuminating the empty beach beyond the pool & lagoon.

Phuket Sunset
Sunset in Phuket near BangTao Beach

Nothing beats a shiny sunset, sea and palm trees
Sunset nearly complete: Phuket

This next one may not fit the bill exactlyl, but it’s one of my favourites, reminding me of a special trip.  I can almost feel the heat of the day as I look at this.

CIMG0109
Phuket: Thai friends on the lake, homeward boung at sunset.

===