Category Archives: Weekly Photo Challenge

A photo challenge sometimes entered weekly, sometimes monthly, it depends on what photos I have available. It also means thinking outside the box sometimes and I confess I’m not great at doing that.

10-Day Travel Photo Challenge: 4

My namesake Marie at Hops, Skips and Jumps has nominated me to take part in the Travel Photo Challenge which involves posting one favourite travel picture each day for ten days and nominating another blogger to do the same – that’s 10 travel pictures and 10 nominations in ten days. Luckily, there’s no text required so I may make it to Day 10 despite Covid and Christmas.

Some you may have seen before but I’ll do my best to find something different each day. It’s hard to decide whether I like a picture because I think it is good or because it reminds me of happy times – sometimes it’s both and that’s a plus.

Today I nominate Bert and Rusha  at Oh, the Places we See, for the challenge. I hope you are able to join in as your pictures are so good, but if not, no pressure. If you do decided to join, please ping back to me to let me know.

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One Word Sunday: History

The Grand Palace, Bangkok

Linked to One Word Sunday here.

In January 2004 the grandson of the then King of Thailand, King Bhumibol, was killed in the tsunami that swept through much of S.E. Asia. Born Bhumi Jensen in 1983, he was the son of the King’s eldest daughter, Princess Ubolratana Rajakanya and her former American husband Peter Jensen. He was also a nephew of the current ruler of Thailand, King Vajiralongkorn. Khun Poom died at Khao Lak in Southern Thailand.

We were in Thailand at the time and we were honoured to be invited by Thai friends to attend the lying-in state for the young Prince at the Royal Palace in Bangkok which was by invitation only. Both men and women dressed in the stipulated black attire. We sat on chairs and were served snacks, conversation was muted and respectful. These are a few of the photographs I took at the time, not good because although photography was permitted, it had to be very discreet and done from one’s position in the room, no flash allowed of course, nor tripods permitted. I don’t think I should have been smiling in the photograph, but at least one of my Thai friends was also smiling!

January 24th, 2005.

Linked to One Word Sunday here.

Six Word Saturday

Linked to https://travelwithintent.com/2020/11/21/beauties-once-soaring-fir-tree-

Not Yet Christmas, Here Comes Spring.

This wasn’t here yesterday. Seen from my balcony this morning my neighbour’s tree has burst into blossom. Maybe not ‘burst’ but showing the flag anyway.

Sculpture Saturday – Cardiff

IN MEMORY OF THE MERCHANT SEAFARERS FROM THE PORTS OF BARRY PENARTH CARDIFF WHO DIED IN TIMES OF WAR

Challenge hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

This striking Merchant Seaman’s Memorial in Cardiff Bay is in the form of a sleeping face fused with a ship’s hull. This was made by riveting plates of metal together, a traditional technique used in early iron and steel ship building. The sculptor Brian Fell, whose own father had been a merchant seaman, was commissioned to create the work in 1994 by Cardiff Bay Arts Trust, Cardiff Bay Development Corporation, Merchant Navy Memorial Committee and Cardiff County Council and it sits in Tiger Bay, Cardiff.

The ports of South Wales played a vital role in supplying coal from Welsh mines to fuel the world’s ships, especially warships and the allies were dependent on merchant vessels to transport troops, food, ammunition, raw materials and equipment. Shipping lanes ran around Pembrokeshire and around the island of Anglesey to get to and from the port of Liverpool and to access the Atlantic; within these lanes German U-boats targeted ships, sinking them with torpedoes and sea mines.

Over 150 vessels were sunk off the coast of Wales during the first World War alone.

Challenge hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

Sculpture Saturday: Budapest

Challenge hosted by Sally Kelly over at Ruined for Life: Phoenix Edition.

Heroes’ Square, Budapest

Designed in 1896 to mark the 1000th Anniversary of the Magyar conquest of the Carpathian Basin, Heroes’ Square (a name given to it in 1932) was designed in 1896 for the celebration of the Millennium of Hungary. The 36-m high column, topped by the Archangel Gabriel holding the Hungarian crown and cross, dominates the square. Around the base of the column are sculptures of Magyar chieftains from the 9th century mounted on horses. The colonnades that run behind the column hold 14 statues of earlier rulers and statesmen from King Stephen to Lajos Kossuth.

Base of Millennium Column in Heroes’ Square, Budapest
Magyar Chiefs at base of Millennium column, Budapest

Sculpture Saturday: Vietnam

An odd one this. We came across this still-being-worked-on monument to the Vietnam War in Hanoi back in 2008. I haven’t been back since so I presume it’s now finished. I was intrigued to discover that the men working on it were not sculptors but stone-masons who were working to a plan drawn up by a ‘government artist’.

One of the workers spoke reasonable English and told me that their parents had all been involved in the ‘American War’ as they called it. They were very keen on education and one of them in particular examined the book I was carrying very thoroughly. I forget now what it was but I gave it to him and he shook my hand so much in gratitude I though it would dislodge from its socket. I still wonder at their lack of bitterness.

One Word Sunday – Arches

Posted in connection with Debbie’s One Word Sunday – Arches

Arches are hard to avoid anywhere with ancient Roman or Greek architecture but I managed to find a ‘natural’ arch to supplement the two historic ones from Sicily/

Cave of the Nymphaen at Syracuse, Sicily
Arch in the rocks off the coast of Lipari, Aeolian Islands
Greek Theatre, Taormina, Sicily

If I had to choose a favourite it would be the Greek Theatre one, through which one can see a snow-covered Etna during the winter or on a still, calm, day, perhaps smoke erupting from the still-active volcano, at all times a perfect background to the play being enacted.

Posted in connection with Debbie’s One Word Sunday – Arches