Sculpture Saturday

The Irish wood-carver John Haugh is not much known outside his own country but he has exhibited and sold many works in the USA. I was privileged to interview him many years ago and this sculpture "Dancing at the Crossroads" is one of my favourites of the many I saw in his studio in Carlingford, … Continue reading Sculpture Saturday

Sculpture Saturday

Sculpture Saturday is hosted by Mind Over Memory As my sculpture of Dionysus uploaded a couple of few weeks ago only showed part of the work I thought I'd add a few more pictures to show the whole carving.  It shows some members if the family of Bacchus. Father: Zeus (supposedly the face of Robert … Continue reading Sculpture Saturday

Silent Sunday

Mid-June 2020. Deserted Resort due to CoronaVirus. A sunny, hot, Sunday afternoon and the beach should be full of families with children playing on the sands, buckets and spades, and the sounds of bat hitting ball. Beach cafes closed, ice-cream parlours boarded up, and the pier locked up. How are the families coping who have … Continue reading Silent Sunday

Sculpture Saturday

Prior to taking a tour through the Vienna Woods I took a walk in the Stadt Park which is full of statues to musicians. Pride of place, of course, goes to the favourite son, Johann Strauss. Link to Mind Over Memory who hosts this challenge.

Sculpture Saturday

This weekly challenge is hosted by Mind Over Memory When the great storm of 1987 raged across the country, one of the old trees in the grounds of Barton Manor on the Isle of Wight, blew down. The then owner, film producer and impresario, Robert Stigwood, best known for theatrical productions like Hair and Jesus … Continue reading Sculpture Saturday

Serenity with Roses

Buddha has found a permanent home I was having my patio renewed and the builder managed to insert a concrete slab into the old wall surrounding part of my garden, strong enough to take the weight of my very heavy stone Buddha head. The greenery and flowers seemed to automatically curl around it.

Unlocking the Past

Brading’s history is apparent from the Norman Church at the top of the incline to the well-preserved 16th and 17th century houses that line both sides of the High Street with their eclectic range of windows, roofs and chimneys.