My Year in Books (2022)

I thought I’d better try and post something before the year ends and then up popped Cathy at 746 books with her meme My Year in Books. I can never resist a quiz or a challenge, so I looked through some of the books I’d read this year and answered her prompts. Here is the result.

In high school I was Lost for Words (Deric Longden).

People might be surprised by Siracusa (Delia Ephron).

I will never be The Whistleblower (Robert Preston).

My life post-lockdown was Act of Oblivion (Robert Harris)

My fantasy job is The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher (Hilary Mantel)

At the end of a long day, I need The Rosie Effect (Graeme Simsion)

I hate being A Keeper (Graham Norton)

I wish I had A Song for Dark Times (Ian Rankin)

My family reunions are Play All (Clive James)

At a party you’d find me with The Sympathizer (Viet Thanh Nguen)

 I’ve never been to The Salt Path (Raynor Winn)

 A happy day includes House of Fun (Simon Hoggart)

Motto I live by:  Kick Ass (Carl Hiassen)

On my bucket list is Hunting Season (Andrea Camilleri)

In my next life, I want to have Nada (Carmen Laforet)

If you feel like joining in, just do your own list from the prompts and let Cathy know.

24 thoughts on “My Year in Books (2022)”

  1. I can see a few books to add to my wish list. I have read a few and The Rosie Project which was wonderful. Might have to do a post about the books I have read. Happy New Year, Maris.

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    1. Lovely to know that we read some of the same books and it would be great to see your list. It’s a fascinating exercise.
      I’ve been looking through my shelves and working out other lists I could do – a great time waster!

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    1. I am at the moment Marie, when I want to blog but I’m not travelling, I’m fed up writing about past journeys, but I don’t like the ‘personal’ blog, so what’s left? I’ve gone back to short stories for my own satisfaction and now I’m looking for competitions in which to enter them as they do not fit the mainstream titles. Obviously, the fault lies with me, I must widen my horizons, move away from my tight little world etc. etc.

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      1. As I was a “reading rat” – that is what my parents called me – I can understand that for a true book enthusiast that’s not a real lot of books.
        A Happy New Year to you, too!

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  2. Can’t imagine why everyone is so struck on your dream job! Hilary Mantel was one of the losses I felt most keenly this year. I’m currently reading the third part of her Thomas Cromwell. The other losses which meant most to me were both musical, and very different: Judith Durham and Christine McVie.

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    1. Mantel was the loss I felt most keenly this year. I do wish that she’d made two books of The Mirror and the Light, purely because of the weight. It cut down my reading time because the book was so heavy I couldn’t hold it for long. Did you see the re-run of Wolf Hall pm BBC 4 last week? I enjoyed it even more this time as I was able to observe actors other than Mark Rylance and was struck by how brilliant so many of them were, especially Jonathan Pryce, Bernard Hill and Claire Foy.

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    1. The problem is making the choices, although not all titles fitted the theme. I read a lot of history as well where the titles are more descriptive of what’s inside the covers. Nice to catch up with people again. Happy New Year.

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  3. Thanks, Jo. I haven’t actually finished The Salt Path yet but I’ve only got another few pages to finish tonight if I can get off the computer. I complain about my friends on Facebook but I’m nearly as bad with my desktop. Happy New Year to you too.

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  4. I haven’t read most of those, Mari, but I like the answers. One for Margaret (From Pyrenees to Pennines), I think. She’s an avid reader. I did have a wander round Cathy’s site though. Last chance to wish you a wonderful year ahead. Happy New Year, hon!

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    1. I’ve just realised that “At the end of a long day I need The Rosie Effect” might not be understood by non-Londoners. I meant it to represent Rosie Lee – a Cuppa Tea! Married to a cockney I picked up a lot of slang from him, some of which still creeps into my conversations.

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