Gothenburg: New Beginnings

In Sweden last week, and despite the -4 degrees, I had one of the best walks I’d had in Gothenburg for many years.  I’ve always loved the city but on earlier visits to family, we’ve stuck to the areas I know and enjoy.

Fish Market
Exterior Fish Market, Gothenburg

My first visit is always to the Feskekorke – quite literally translated as “fish church” – where fishmongers have been hawking their freshest wares since 1847 and where the shop in the basement and the restaurant up top can satisfy both the inner and outer gourmand.  Sweden’s fish, in its quality, is the best in the world in my opinion.

The Avenyn

Then there’s the Avenyn, the wide Boulevard that runs from the centre of town up to the Konstmuseet, where one can see works by Van Gogh, Picasso and Rembrandt, and some truly delightful 19th-century Nordic art, including the beautiful, evocative paintings of Carl Larsson.  The old part of town is known as The Haga, well worth a visit to browse the chic boutiques in the narrow streets full of old Swedish charm, and to people watch from the cafés that serve everything from vegan to high-end Scandinavian food.  Many of these are housed in pretty 19th-century wooden dwellings that not long ago were slated for demolition.

Skansen Kronan, Gothenburg- Pixabay
Skansen Kronan, on Risåsberget Hill in the Haga district.

 

Shopping Mall, Gothenburg
Shopping Mall in Gothenburg

I never seemed to get beyond these places, partly because of the numerous coffee shops selling cinnamon buns that I found it difficult to resist.  In Gothenburg, independent coffee shops are the rule: ask for a Starbucks and you’ll be directed to the train station where you’ll find the only branch of the chain in the city.  Coffee comes strong and black but there us always milk on the side.  In many places, a second cup comes free.

This time in Gothenburg, however, we went somewhere quite different.Canal walk in Gothenburg

The Gothia River, which cuts through the city, was home to the massive Swedish shipbuilding industry between the mid-19th century and its demise in the 1970s, much like the shipbuilding industry in Scotland and Belfast.Canal walk in Gothenburg 2

 

At its peak, 15,200 employees worked in the industry; Gothenburg was known as a shipbuilding town and Sweden was a world-leading shipbuilding nation.

Work in progressIn recent years, however, the wharves, factories and large tracts of derelict land have been undergoing a slow and painstaking transformation.  The area of Lindholmen is now one of the most dynamic places in Gothenburg, a hub of entrepreneurial skills, universities, colleges, and a business hub to encourage business and academia to work together.   Cranes and overhead gantries are silhouetted against the sky, ferries bustle across the water carrying workers and residents of the new elegant apartments lining the embankment to and from the new ‘town’.

Stena Line Boats in Harbour
Stena Line ships awaiting passengers in the Harbour

Lindholmen has moved on and has morphed from a lively shipbuilding area into a flourishing residential town, businesses have relocated here and former industrial buildings have become sports halls, gymnasiums, and chic cafes and restaurants.  The well-laid out streets and paths along the waterside, the canals that run through the ‘town’ and the sense of a young, innovative spirit is palpable. The free ferry ride to Lindholmen

There are many ways of getting to Lindholmen, bus, tram, cycling or by the free ferries which runs every 8 minutes between Stenpiren and Lindholmspiren, weekdays between the hours of 07:00 to 18:00. The ride only takes 5 minutes.

AsOne of the sleek ferryboats that criss-crosses the river in Gothenburg we had walked from the train station in town we took the ferry and walked around the area, admiring the elegant apartments with balconies that overlooked the harbour, the colourful buildings and the ducks that waddled up to us when it looked as though we might stop and feed them.  Canal in Gothenburg (Lindholmen)It was a delightful walk in an area I’d never visited before, but it’s now on my list for further exploration and a return visit to the Turkish restaurant which served one of the best pastas I’ve had in years.

How’s that for Internationalism!

Gothenburg, colourful building
New colourful buildings in the University/Business area of Lindholmen

A few tips:

Invest in a Göteborg City Card. It may seem pricey at £28 for 24 hours, but this gives you free or reduced entry to most museums and attractions, free travel on public transport including the Gothia River ferry taxis, as well as some city tours.

Do have a ride on Electric bus route 55:  Gothenburg’s first route for electric buses runs between Lindholmen Science Park and Johanneberg Science Park via Avenyn, Brunnsparken and Götaälvbron. The buses are silent and emission-free and run on electricity from wind power and hydropower. The bus route is among the most modern in the world. Among other things, passengers can recharge their phones onboard and enter and exit the bus from indoors. Ordinary Västtrafik tickets are used to ride the bus.

Beware of cyclists – like many Scandinavian countries, the bicycle is king in Gothenburg. Don’t walk on the cycle tracks (the trails are well posted on the pavements) and keep a particular eye out for them on the pavements of the wider streets.  Bike station, Pixabay

End of the day over Gothenburg Harbour
Sunshine on a steely sea: late afternoon, Lindholmen, Gothenburg

 

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6 thoughts on “Gothenburg: New Beginnings

  1. My husband just enjoyed reading your blog and the photos of Gothenburg. He was the logistic manager for Volvo Switzerland and was often in Gothenburg on business. I remember one trip at Christmas when he was there for the St. Lucia celebrations. One of the hotels he stayed in was Hotel Europa, near the fish market which he visited twice on various journeys. He saw a lot of Gothenburg, went on a few boat trips and even found a jazz club to spend time in the evenings. He is now many years retired but he liked Gothenburg. He would love to visit again with me, but we are now both golden oldies.

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  2. How lovely to hear from someone who knows Gothenburg. My sister lives there with her two sons and numerous grandchildren so I have a lot to enjoy when I visit. One of my great-nephews is currently working at the Volvo plant – I think – I can’t always keep up with them. Lots of Jazz there still (I’m a big jazz fan) and as our costs have gone up so much in the UK, Sweden doesn’t seem so expensive nowadays! I always come home laden with vacuumed packed salmon in all different ways. I wish my photos had been better but I too, am a golden oldie (very oldie) and I can only carry a basic camera now which is not always adequate.

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  3. It’s lovely to visit new places, but it’s also lovely to go somewhere familiar and not feel obliged to “do” the big sights. Then you can find unexpected treasures in more obscure places. Gothenburg sounds interesting.

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